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20121101
20121130
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to washington as the nation's candidate for u.s. senate, goes to washington, already six feet tall, at the front of the line when they go to the white house and kennedy finishes his speech, bill clinton looks forward and gets his picture taken a long side of john f. kennedy. he is so proud and he already is dedicated to the idea that he is going to be the person who is going to bring complete honor to the family. by the age of 17 he is planning to be elected attorney general of arkansas and governor of arkansas and president of the united states. this is something which everyone who knows him knows about. he talks about it all the time. he does not go to the university of arkansas. egos to georgetown. from georgetown he becomes the arkansas candidate for rhodes scholarship and goes to oxford. he is an incredible success everywhere but he cannot have a sustained ongoing relationship with a woman. he is attracted to the kind of women his mother direct him to who are the beauty queens, the ones who are flirtatious, who are attractive and that is where his i has been. until he goes back to yale law
leave a legacy to the nation. the list of those in the second term and would george washington, james madison, andrew jackson, theodore roosevelt, dwight eisenhower, rall reagan and bill clinton. lincoln has a special case in the successful second term. it's interesting to note that only the president had a more successful second term than the first or james madison and andrew jackson. the following is an accounting of the president elected to the second term and the reason for those are the trouble second term. member for field because of the war that seemed on winnable or for lack of preparedness. jefferson, truman, johnson and bush were the four. also failed because of economic crisis or the failure to act to detour such a crisis and these were jefferson, cleveland, coolidge, franklin roosevelt with a 37 downturn and george bush to eight failed due to their inability to leave with jefferson, wilson, truman, johnson, nixon and bush. they failed to to franklin roosevelt and richard nixon. four of them did not effectively communicate this agenda or initiative were jefferson, monroe, g
the vote. he says, what if somebody who really doesn't like washington, like maybe their son got overlooked for promotion or some thing. washington had dirty anointed items as a vice presidential possibility. they say what if everybody votes for adam, but a few disgruntled souls strawberry vote from washington, what will happen? atoms will sneak through the presidency. so he writes letters to people in six of the 11 state. we need to throw with seven or eight those for adam. to insure against this possible. not isn't he the guy who said there's no intrigue and somehow it is secure. how could they deluded themselves to doing not? look, they're tired and want to move on, not the intuitive definition is like in entries like people whispering in the corridors of european courts and they don't even entertain the notion that entry can happen through the mail over a period of time and political interests might develop some people might focus around one candidate or another. this just doesn't occur to them or at least they don't ask the hard questions. so anyway, meanwhile the presidency is now the
of those who prevailed in their second term includes george washington, james madison, and rejection, theodore roosevelt, dwight eisenhower, ronald reagan and bill clinton. lincoln is a special case and that his successful second term was so brief. it is interesting to note-only presidents who had a more successful second term than their first word james madison and andrew jackson. the following is an accounting of the president's elected to a second term and the reason for those of experience failed or troubled second terms. four failed because of a war that seemed unwinnable war for lack of preparedness. jefferson, truman, johnson and. were the four. also four failed because of economic crisis or failure to act to deter such a crisis. jefferson, cleveland, coolidge, franklin roosevelt, the 37 downturn and george bush. eight who failed due to their inability to lead congress were jefferson, monroe, grant, wilson, truman, johnson, nixon and george bush. two failed due to who boris. franklin roosevelt and richard nixon. four who did not effectively communicate their agendas or initiat
-- the teachers including is a great one. the schools in washington, very successful about turning around inner city kids, and the kids in that school have to carry a book at all times. it's neat. funny you mention that. i did a reading at my home town, and my 2nd grade teacher was there. she's like 92 years old. i was signing books, and she said, james, your handwriting is still atrocious. [laughter] >> that's great. talk a little bit about where you see our culture going. you're doing -- >> oh, my god. >> i don't mean in general, but in terms of reading. are we creating a culture of readers, notary -- non-readers, where are we now? >> i think the worst thing that's happening is we're creating a culture where people don't listen. they don't listen to the other side. there's a quote -- i read an editorial in the "new york times" a couple weeks ago, and it had to do with morality's ability to behind -- bind and blind, and, you know, it binds people, you believe in, you know, you believe in whatever you believe in, abortion one way or the other or whatever you believe about entitlements or whatev
how to manipulate the levers of power in washington. he understood human nature, understood the strength and weaknesses of the people in congress and how to play on those weaknesses and strengths. obama doesn't have that skill set to use human nature as a way of getting done what he wants to get done in washington. >> host: holm books have you written? >> guest: i think this is my 11th book. three novels and eight nonfiction. >> host: what do you say to critics of your books? >> guest: what do the critics say. >> host: the accuracy of the stories you tell, et cetera. >> guest: well, the fact of the matter is, as far as i know, there hasn't been a single fact in this book that's been challenged in a kind of credible way. people have said, oh, klein makes things up. that's what kids in the schoolyard -- they call each other names. i've been called all kinds of names. but in fact when it comes to the credibility of my reporting, i don't think anybody has laid a glove on me yet. >> host: how many university were you editor. >> guest: 12 years assed debtor in chief of "new york t
of acceptable discussion. it's only in official in washington that this has not been, you know, accepted, and, by the way, i hate to pick the liberals down one more time, but i have never, in my life, heard legalization of drugs talk about in a presidential debate until the first republican primary debit, end of last year or this year, and they got a big round of applause. they did not get through it off the stage. they got laughed at by mitt romney and the rest of them, but you take out the little, what we call in marxist theory, the super structure of the party apparatus, and everybody takes it seriously. maybe the guys will contradict me. >> i prefer taxes on consumption opposed to an investment or anything that creates additional income. i'm not a fan of the drug war so i don't object to it. i'm skeptical of marijuana legalization as a grand deficit reduction strategy. i have to see numbers suggesting it would bring in the types of revenue that we're really talking about, and politically, it will be a very difficult thing to do so i'm not sure -- i'm in favor of it, but i'm not sure it's
. >> caller: thank you. the people are so tired of the fighting in washington. like the one candidate said, if they don't do their job they do not get paid. we, the people come have got to start taking these matters into hands because we are sick of it. and, you know, what i would like to tell john boehner is don't give in to this craziness. this is nothing but craziness. and i watched harry reid yesterday. you know, he talked and he talked and he really said nothing. then he went on about dance, dance, dance and i thought to myself all you do is dance around with these bills that they send. the house will have a bill, they send it to the senate and what does he do? dances around it and never addresses it. >> host: know by partisanship than for you? >> caller: no, absolutely none. then when he left the stage and was walking off, the man -- i feel bad for him that he just can't get it together -- he grabbed ahold of the flag. he was falling. then he grabbed ahold of low wall and at that point i said uh oh that man needs to go home. he's too old to be there. he doesn't do his job and is coll
. thank you, jamal for the introduction. again, i'm jonathan capehart, opinion brighter at the washington post an msnbc contributor. they've set the stage for why we are here this morning, so i'm not going to keep talking. i'm just going to get started. you have heard from marc morial. next is joel packer, noted authority in federal education policy. to his left is dr. michael fauntroy at george mason university where he teaches urban policy comes civil rights policy and american government and we have just heard from janet murguia from national council of the bras. with that, mr. packer, to make is yours. >> first, thank you for the introduction and mark and chanel for others for having me on the piano with my colleagues here. so a couple of good things about the raising group in case you don't know. the briefing groups and government affairs, public affairs firm with 42 folks on our staff. overall majority of clients or progressive nonprofit organizations. firms really committed to advancing the ideals and missions of the whole broad range of the progressive community. personally i do e
shift. i remember when i came to washington in the 1980s, people were writing an article, i wrote an article for -- i wrote an article for -- remember that carline bowman -- was that public opinion? >> yeah, yeah. >> on the block, the electoral law, that there was a republican electoral law. i think you'll probably start to see people talk about a democratic electoral lock due to these changing demographics. so the hispanic numbers picked up, and we are seeing an electric whether democrats democrats are doing well among african-americans, hispanics, asians, younger voters and white liberals. and that, that needle appears to have moved slightly to the democrats so that if you have a kind of normal base election, the democrats have a very slight advantage. i think most people will say we will continue to grow over time, unless the republicans do something to make inroads among what now are becoming some poor democratic constituencies, at least some. but if you look at the house races, you have to be cautious about the big message you are drawing. if the democrats again what looks to
in washington. more americans are talking about the constitution because of senator lee and more intelligently because of him and members of the senate including some in his own caucus are feeling a little more pain and anxiety when they back efforts that lack a firm foundation in the founding principles. knowing that senator lee will be there at the barricades with a copy of this dog your pocket constitution. welcome back senator lee. [applause] >> thank you. is good to be among friends. also hard to believe it has been two years since i was elected, almost two years since i took office. i'm glad we will be hearing from my good friend and soon-to-be colleague ted cruise in just a little while. i was very pleased when he was elected. i met him just a couple years ago just after my election and shortly before he announced his candidacy. i look forward to joining him and having enjoy in our body. i especially look forward to no longer being the newest member of the senate. has been a rough transition. the security staff is finally recognizing me as a senator. i know offer get carded. i am from u
national book festival on the national mall in washington, d.c., bob woodward presents his book, "the price of politics." this is about 45 minutes. [applause] >> thank you. thanks.k it's great to be here. i'm going to put myself on the clock so i don't talk too long,h and then we have lots of time for questions. and then we have lots of times the questions. and i want to begin by recounting something that occurred about five or six years ago my wife and i were at an aging conference and how to deal with aging. how many people are interested in the subject of aging? raise your hand. okay, you all are. i tell you. at age 69, i am deeply interested in the subject of aging. and they have psychiatrists and physicians and so forth on this panel. james watson, who was the codiscoverer of dna, the nobel prize winner was also on the panel. we had the discussion and it went on for an hour, and watson said nothing. that is the end of zero comments. now, you know the power of silence was just overwhelming, and so finally, the moderator, charlie rose asked him, doctor watson, you have done so much work,
to health care and the annual national lawyer's convention in washington, d.c. hosted by the federalist society. the topic is the future of constitutional law and the supreme court. this is just over half an hour. >> good morning, for the first address today, we welcome a man who is no stranger to hard work. raised in ad 340est household, learned the value of money, hard work, and traditional values, and this guided his pursuit of the american dream ever since. after earning the ged from smu, worked in the largest law firm specializing in health care manners. later, in founding the hospital corporation, he established what has become the largest for-profit health care conglomerate in the nation. they employee over 199,000 people, that's job creation, of course. [applause] it provides quality health care to millions of people, but he didn't rest there. they have also worked with a group calledded world vision to provide primary health care, a primary health care system in kenya, and he upheld the commitment to the people of florida emphasizing the importance of accountability, ran the ca
confidence men: wall street, washington, and the education of a president." the atlantic, aspen institute, and the newseum hosted the forum. >> we have one titled "why did he win and why did he lose"? it was about obama, and now the title is "how did he win?" we have three authors of excellent books about president obama, john alter, ron suskind, and draifd maraniss who will be interviewedded by a great biographer, and my former editor, walter isakson, and asked the question what is he really like? >> and where is the profile? >> yeah. it's only laptop. i'll get it to you after this is over. walter, thank you. >> margaret, thank you, thank you, all, great to be here. [applause] david, for those who can't figure out which is wish, david, jonathan, and that's ron. the next book -- in fact, starting in the middle with john. talking about -- i can say your title; right? >> well, it would be the first time, but that's all right. >> breaking news here. those who like the fall can,s things fall apart, his book is "the center holds" which is about this election. what is it in your first book abou
in bellingham, washington, good afternoon. please go ahead with your question or comment for steven johnson. >> caller: hi, pleasure speaking to you. 8, i was a first wave environmental planner back in the mid '70s, so i'dhead of your ghost -- i'd heard of your ghost maps story. and in -- after i graduated i thought i'd kick around the idea of architecture plus ecology and play with computer models and satellite data late at night without authorization. [laughter] before the term hacker or geospatial intelligence technology was invented. anyway, i became a mr. mom in '82 because that was really going nowhere. today, however, it looks like, you know, cloud technology and c factor computing and a lot of these breakthroughs are going to make three dimensional environmental computing feasible. the problem i saw then was a global vision in a flat world, you know? we didn't really have a three dimensional philosophy. to work with this new technology. and i don't even see it there now. and it's kind of a little troubling, you know? any comments, thoughts? thanks. >> guest: yeah, great. what an int
in the senate, which is contrary to what anybody in washington, i think, thought, even as late as labor day. we know the house is going to stay roughly the same. absent breaking news, i bring you no precinct returns from florida. i'd like to spend more time on why this is happened, and what that means for us going forward. first, i share the admiration all around for president obama's campaign team. they were tech nickically close to perfect in the first responsibility of a campaign team, that is to identify and turn out voters. they planned it. they executed it. every step of the way, they knew what votes they needed, got out and got them. they began weeks before election day banking favorable votes in states where they had already had people on the ground preplabbed to produce. again, technically, a superb operation, one to set the standard for future campaigns and now you identify your voters, encourage them to turn out, and perhaps some people think by the fourth or fifth visit or phone call verging on harassment to turn themçó out, t it worked. the point i want to make beyond that, howev
conditions of declining public order. >> i guess there's a tradition in washington d.c. whenever one is asked about making a position come you make one of those predictions. the next 18 months are critical, something along those lines. going to do something very similar. >> that won't won't do it on the sunday morning talk show. >> what i'm going to say here as i think one thing our discussion has alluded to is between the presidency and egypt in a variety of bureaucratic entries. not just the military, but the deep state is going to be very critical. the question of whether he will call a will be extremely important. it's not just the question of that compensation we been waiting for between the president and the various bureaucratic powers, the president, particularly the military and security service. we also look at the relationship between the president and the ear of the muslim brotherhood. is there enough sufficient room for tension between the two sides in such an irreverent end up in a presidency can emerge clicks if that actually happens someday, that sort of the new ballgame in the
in washington, d.c.. the remarks said justice roberts decision on the health care law was a sharp aberration to establish early in his career. after senator lee, senator cruz from texas discusses the election results. this is about one hour. >> i serve as the executive vice president of the federalist society. we hope that you are all having a great time here at our 30th anniversary convention. it's hard to believe that this is the third occasion i think on which -- at which we are welcoming united states senator mike lee to the it seems like yesterday, senator, when you came to us just after your election in 2010 presenting your vision of the system of limited constitutional government. i remember you describing with a sense of hope and of those the house some the desired use all among the people on the campaign trail for the return to the komen principles. i suspect those principles do not resonate out quite the same pitch in the hallways of the senate as they did among the people on the campaign trail. nevertheless, it is apparent from his work and his efforts senator lee is the irrepress
american legion. gets nominated to go to washington as the quote, unquote, boys nation candidate for u.s. senate. goes to washington, he's already six feet tall, he strides to the front of the line when they got white house to president kennedy, and then kennedy finishes his speech, bill clinton goes forward and gets his picture taken. he's so proud. he already is dedicated to the idea that he is going to be the person who is going to bring complete honor it family. he already by the age of 17 is planning to be elected attorney general of arkansas and governor of aver and president the united states. this is something that everyone knows him knows about. he talk about it is all the time. ..
're a tourist, suppose you go to washington, d.c., you want to sit in on a congressional hearing, but there may be a very long line if it's a popular hearing, and you might like standing on long lines. you can now go to a company called line-standing.com -- [laughter] pay them a certain amount of money. they will hire someone -- usually a homeless person or someone who needs the work -- to hold the place online for hours and hours, overnight if need be, and when the hearing begins, you can take your place in the line and go into the hearing room. the same thing, you can do the same thing, by the way, if you want to sit in on an oral argument before the u.s. supreme court. linestanding.com. or suppose you want to contribute to alleviating a social tragedy in in this country. each year thousands of babies born to drug-addicted mothers. there's a charity you could contribute to that tries to use a market mechanism to solve this terrible problem. they offer any drug-addicted woman $300 to be sterilized, the use of a market incentive. or suppose you have a new drug, let's say you're a pharmaceutical
in washington and certainly talk a lot about that during the conference, but i think the focus right now has to be dealing with this fiscal cliff and putting the competitive agenda in place and if we don't do that i believe that we will not be able to get the kind of economic recovery that we all hope for and that we have been lacking over the last few years. >> let me ask another question. i want to get to the agenda but address at least one more question about the campaign and the republican coalition and that is young people. a lot of discussion in the press the last week or so that you didn't make as many as you thought you would despite the fact a lot of them are living at home and there's not a great job market for them and the president still has about 60% of that vote. is this partly a cultural issue message? is gay marriage for example one of those threshold issues now that makes the republican party look out of touch with those voters? and you have to change that gave republicans talk about that issue? >> yeah. [laughter] >> that's a very big concession because a lot of the colleag
nixon policy conference held in washington in march of 1993, and this was the conference around which nixon's very public criticism of president bush's handling of the russian transition from communism to democracy had swirled. nixon had written a very scathing memorandum criticizing the administration's handling of that transition, and he criticized it as "pathetically inadequate"; that he thought the administration was not supporting boris yeltsin enough financially. and he had written this memorandum, and it had leaked and it exploded on the front page of the new york times. so president bush was going to be forced to answer nixon's criticism at nixon's conference so nixon was caught in the maelstrom of all these highly dramatic events, and i accompanied him to washington for that conference. and nixon hosted a different group of people at his head table for each panel discussion, and i was asked to join his head table during zbigniew brzezinksi's panel discussion. and i sat to the right of president nixon, and to the right of me was james schlesinger. and i noticed that there was
washington post" was asked about the decision, do you approve of the decision to keep open the guantanamo prison for terror suspects. 70% of the american people who answered that survey said yes, we approve of it. i want people to understand who we're talking about transferring from guantanamo bay to the united states of america. understand the individuals and some of their backgrounds who are being held at guantanamo bay, coming to a neighborhood near you. this is, of course, the mastermind of september 11, khalid sheik mohammed who is being held at guantanamo bay. he's often called k.s.m., he's described as the mastermind of the 9/11 attacks. he claims to have personally decapitated american journalist daniel pearl in 2002 and committed to playing a part in 30 terrorist plots, including a 1995 plot to blow up 12 u.s. airliners flying from southeast asia to the united states for which he was indicted the following year, 1993 world trade center bombing, a plot to hit towers in chicago, new york, los angeles, and nuclear power stations. he claimed he was involved in a plot to assassinate p
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